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The Lisbon Treaty: Law, Politics, and Treaty Reform

The Lisbon Treaty: Law, Politics, and Treaty ReformTitoloThe Lisbon Treaty: Law, Politics, and Treaty Reform
AutoreCraig, Paul
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CategoriaLaw: Legal History
Law: International
Political Science: International Relations - Treaties
RilegaturaHardcover
Dati466 p.
Anno2011
EditoreOxford University Press, USA
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Descrizione
This book offers an overview of the principal reforms to the European Union brought about by the Lisbon Treaty. The book gives an account of the extended Treaty reform process, analyses in detail the main legal and governance changes effected by the Treaty, and examines these against the background political forces that shaped the new provisions.

Indice e argomenti trattati
List of Abbreviations
xv
Table of Cases and Legislation
xvii
Chapter 1 Reform, Process, and Architecture
1
1 From Nice to Laeken: The Shaping of the Reform Agenda
1
a The Council and the European Council
2
b The Commission
4
c The European Parliament
5
2 The Convention on the Future of Europe: From Talking Shop to Draft Constitutional Treaty
6
a Spring 2002: a viable way forward through Working Groups
7
b Autumn 2002: the defining `convention moment'---the decision to press for a Constitutional Treaty
8
c Autumn 2002: sketching the constitutional architecture through the Preliminary Draft Constitutional Treaty
10
d Winter and spring 2003: internal and external discourse about institutions
10
e Spring and summer 2003: centralization of initiative to the Praesidium and the Secretariat in the closing stages
14
3 The Inter-Governmental Conference: Deliberation, Discord, and Decision
16
a The IGC deliberations: an Italian autumn
16
b The Brussels European Council December 2003: the `winter of our discontent'
18
c The Brussels European Council June 2004: the Irish secure agreement
19
4 From Constitutional Treaty to Lisbon Treaty: Crisis, Reflection, and Ratification
20
a 2005: `Ratification' and `Reflection'
20
b January to June 2007: from reflection to action
21
c July to December 2007: the IGC and the Lisbon Treaty
23
5 Lisbon Treaty: Architecture and Structure
25
a Formal architecture
25
b Substantive architecture: general
25
c Substantive architecture: the pillar structure and the Common Foreign and Security Policy
27
d Substantive architecture: the pillar structure and Police and Judicial Cooperation in Criminal Matters
28
6 Reflections on Constitutional Reform
29
a Content
29
b Process
30
Chapter 2 Legislation, Regulation, and Participation
32
1 Legislative Power and Democracy
33
a Legislative acts: initiation and agenda setting
33
b The European Parliament: voting and empowerment
36
c The Council: formations and voting
39
d National Parliaments: input and subsidiarity
45
2 Delegated Acts and Power
48
a Political history: contestation and power
48
b Treaty reform: Commission objectives
56
c The Lisbon Treaty: delegated and implementing acts
57
d Delegated acts: survival of Comitology
58
e Delegated acts: demise of Comitology
59
f Delegated acts: the inter-institutional balance of power
61
g Implementing acts: Comitology and the inter-institional balance of power
64
3 Participatory Democracy and Inclusion
66
a The EC Treaty: promise and performance
67
b Lisbon Treaty: promise and expectation
70
4 Conclusion
71
a Legislative acts: democracy, improvement, and deficit
71
b Delegated acts: power, value choices, and control
75
c Participatory democracy: expectation, hope, and fulfilment
77
Chapter 3 Executive Power, Contestation, and Resolution
78
1 Process
79
2 The President(s) of the Union
81
a One President or two: hats and labels
81
b The President(s) of the Union: power and authority
83
3 The High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy
88
4 The Commission
89
a The Commission President: election and legitimacy
89
b The Commission: size and appointment
92
5 Agencies
97
a Agencies: pre-Lison
97
b Agencies: post-Lisbon
100
6 The Post-Lisbon World: The Disposition of Executive Power
100
a The argument against shared executive power
101
b The argument for shared executive power
101
7 The Post-Lisbon World: The Reality of Shared Executive Power
103
a Commission, Council, and European Council: priorities and agenda setting
104
b Commission, Council, and European Council: development of policy choices
108
c Commission, Council, and European Council: the High Representative
110
d EU institutions: financial resources and the budget
112
e Council and Commission: agencies
113
8 The Post-Lisbon World: Accountability and Shared Executive Power
115
a Legal accountability: closing the gaps
115
b Political accountability: securing political responsibility
116
9 Conclusion
120
Chapter 4 Courts, Continuity, and Change
122
1 Lisbon Treaty, Courts, and Appointment
122
2 Lisbon Treaty, Courts, and Jurisdiction
124
a Continuity: general heads of jurisdiction
124
b Change: particular heads of jurisdiction
125
c Change: particular heads of jurisdiction and privileged applicants
127
d Change: particular heads of jurisdiction and standing for individual applicants
129
e Change: scope of jurisdiction
132
3 Lisbon Treaty, Judicial Architecture, and the Status Quo
133
a Judicial architecture: Convention deliberations
133
b Judicial architecture: ECJ, General Court, and direct actions
136
c Judicial architecture: ECJ, General Court, and preliminary rulings
140
4 Lisbon Treaty, Courts, and Judicial Doctrine
145
a Direct effect
146
b Supremacy
146
5 Lisbon Treaty, Ratification, and National Courts
151
6 Conclusion
154
Chapter 5 Competence, Categories, and Control
155
1 The Nature of the `Competence Problem'
156
2 The Aims of the Laeken Declaration
157
3 Categories and Consequences
158
4 Exclusive Competence
159
a Basic principles: meaning and scope
159
b Area exclusivity: demarcation and delimitation
159
c Conditional exclusivity: demarcation and delimitation
161
5 Shared Competence
167
a Basic principles: meaning and scope
167
b Shared competence: demarcation and delimitation
169
c Shared competence: EU action and pre-emption
171
d Shared competence: variation and specification
173
6 Supporting, Coordinating, or Supplementary Action
173
a Basic principles: meaning and scope
173
b Supporting, coordinating, or supplementing: demarcation and delimitation
174
c Supporting, coordinating, or supplementing: scope and variation
174
d Tensions: legal acts and Member State competence
176
e Tensions: legal acts and harmonization
177
7 Economic, Employment, and Social Policy
178
a Basic principles: meaning and scope
178
b Social policy: demarcation and delimitation
180
c Economic, employment, and social policy: category and consequence
180
d Economic policy: power and limits
181
8 Common Foreign and Security Policy and Defence
182
9 The `Flexibility' Clause
182
10 Subsidiarity, Proportionality, and the Role of National Parliaments
184
11 Conclusion
187
a Clarity: aim and realization
187
b Containment: aim and realization
188
Chapter 6 Rights, Legality, and Legitimacy
193
1 Charter of Fundamental Rights
193
a Fundamental rights: origins and development
193
b Charter: genesis and drafting
196
c EU: human rights policy
198
2 Lisbon Treaty
199
a Charter: status and place
199
b ECHR: status and place
201
3 Charter Content
204
4 Reach of the Charter
206
a Union institutions: verticality and horizontality
206
b Member States: verticality and horizontality
210
5 Competence and the Charter
214
6 Rights, Principles, and the Charter
216
a Rights and principles: rationale for the divide
216
b Rights and principles: nature of the divide
217
c Rights and principles: consequences of the divide
219
7 Limitations and the Charter
221
a Limitation of rights: prior jurisprudence
221
b Limitation of rights: Article 52(1)
222
8 Treaty and Charter
226
a Application: Charter rights and Treaty rights
227
b Application: Charter rights and Union legislation
228
c Application: Charter rights and the Courts' jurisprudence
230
d Principle: to replicate or not to replicate
232
9 ECHR and Charter
232
a Approach: Charter rights that correspond to ECHR rights
232
b Consequence: same meaning and scope
233
10 National Contitutions and the Charter
234
a National constitutions: interpretative obligation
234
b National constitutions: substantive obligation
235
11 International Law and the Charter
236
12 UK/Poland Protocol and the Charter
237
a Protocol: content
237
b Protocol: political background
238
c Protocol: legal effect
238
13 Remedies and the Charter
240
14 Conclusion: Judicial Review, Legitimacy, and the Charter
243
a Charter: the profile of judicial review
243
b Charter: the legitimacy of judicial review
244
Chapter 7 Legal Acts, Hierarchy, and Simplification
246
1 Constitutional Treaty and the Hierarchy of Norms
247
a Rationale: simplification, democratic legitimacy, and separation of powers
247
b Constitutional Treaty: categories and hierarchy of legal act
248
2 Lisbon Treaty and the Hierarchy of Norms
250
a Lisbon Treaty: types of legal act
250
b Lisbon Treaty: categories and hierarchy of legal act
252
3 Lisbon Treaty and Legislative Acts
255
a Political dimension: democracy and enhanced legitimacy
255
b Legal dimension: formalism and attendant problems
256
4 Lisbon Treaty and Delegated Acts
260
a Political dimension: delegated acts and the balance of power
260
b Legal dimension: delegated acts and judicial control
263
5 Lisbon Treaty and Implementing Acts
270
a Political dimension: objective and tension
270
b Legal dimension: dichotomy and tension
272
6 Lisbon Treaty and Incomplete Categorization
282
7 Lisbon Treaty and the Common Foreign and Security Policy
283
8 Conclusion
284
Chapter 8 The Treaty, the Economic, and the Social
286
1 EC Treaty
287
a Output legitimacy: original intent and subsequent development
287
b Input legitimacy: rationales for the shift
306
2 Constitutional Treaty
309
a Working Group on Social Europe
309
b Working Group on Economic Governance
311
3 Lisbon Treaty: General
311
a Values and objectives
311
b Competence and consequences
313
c Duties and mandatory considerations
313
d Duties and administrative cooperation
314
4 Lisbon Treaty: The Economic
315
a Continuity
315
b Change
319
5 Lisbon Treaty: The Social
322
a Continuity
322
b Change
326
6 Conclusion
329
Chapter 9 Freedom, Security, and Justice
331
1 Maastricht to Lisbon
332
a Maastricht: Three Pillars
332
b Amsterdam: Three Pillars modified
335
2 Lisbon Treaty: General Principles
336
a Values and objectives
336
b Treaty and architecture
337
c Competence and the AFSJ
338
d Courts and judicial doctrine
339
e UK and the AFSJ
341
3 Lisbon Treaty: General Provisions
343
a The `lead' provision
343
b Role of European Council
344
c Role of the Council
344
d Role of Council committees
344
e Role of the European Parliament
346
f Role of national parliaments
346
g Role of evaluation
346
h Role of Member States
347
i Substantive scope of EU power
347
4 Lisbon Treaty: Borders, Asylum, and Immigration
348
a Pre-Lisbon
348
b Post-Lisbon
350
c Dualities and tensions
354
5 Lisbon Treaty: Civil Law and Procedure
357
a Pre-Lisbon
357
b Post-Lisbon
357
c Dualities and tensions
359
6 Lisbon Treaty: Criminal Law and Procedure
361
a Pre-Lisbon
361
b Post-Lisbon
363
c Dualities and tensions
370
7 Conclusion: Looking Back and Looking Forward
374
a Looking back: Tampere and Hague
374
b Looking forward: Stockholm
376
Chapter 10 External Action, Foreign Policy, and Defence
379
1 Lisbon Treaty: Architecture, Principles, and Institutions
380
a Architecture
380
b Principles
381
c Institutions
383
d Legal personality
387
2 Lisbon Treaty: EU External Action
387
a Common Commercial Policy
388
b Cooperation with third countries and humanitarian aid
391
c Restrictive measures
395
d International agreements
396
e Association agreements
402
f EU relations with international organizations, third countries, and union delegations
404
3 Lisbon Treaty: Common Foreign and Security Policy
405
a Pre-Lisbon
405
b Post-Lisbon
408
4 Consistency, Coherence, and Coordination
422
a Purpose
422
b Institutions
426
c Doctrine
429
5 Conclusion
435
Chapter 11 Enhanced Cooperation, Amendment, and Conclusion
437
1 Enhanced Cooperation Pre-Lisbon
437
2 Enhanced Cooperation Post-Lisbon
439
a General rules
440
b Particular rules
442
3 Amendment Pre-Lisbon
443
4 Amendment Post-Lisbon
444
a Ordinary revision procedure
444
b Simplified revision procedures
446
5 Conclusion
448
a Enhanced cooperation
448
b Amendment and revision
450
c Process
451
d Content
453
Index457

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