The Complete History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire

The Complete History Of The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire

Edward Gibbon

0 recensioni
Con la tua recensione raccogli punti Premium
Formato: EPUB
Testo in en
Cloud: Scopri di più
Compatibilità: Tutti i dispositivi (eccetto Kindle) Scopri di più
Dimensioni: 7,23 MB
  • EAN: 9780599443006
pagabile con 18App pagabile con Carta del Docente
Articolo acquistabile con 18App e Carta del Docente

€ 31,99

Punti Premium: 32

Venduto e spedito da IBS

EBOOK INGLESE
Aggiungi al carrello
spinner
Fai un regalo
spinner

non è possibile acquistare ebook su dispositivi Apple. Puoi comunque aggiungerli alla wishlist

Gaia la libraia

Gaia la libraia Vuoi ricevere un'email sui tuoi prodotti preferiti? Chiedi a Gaia, la tua assistente personale

The great work of Gibbon is indispensable to the student of history. The literature of Europe offers no substitute for "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire." It has obtained undisputed possession, as rightful occupant, of the vast period which it comprehends. However some subjects, which it embraces, may have undergone more complete investigation, on the general view of the whole period, this history is the sole undisputed authority to which all defer, and from which few appeal to the original writers, or to more modern compilers. The inherent interest of the subject, the inexhaustible labor employed upon it; the immense condensation of matter; the luminous arrangement; the general accuracy; the style, which, however monotonous from its uniform stateliness, and sometimes wearisome from its elaborate ar., is throughout vigorous, animated, often picturesque always commands attention, always conveys its meaning with emphatic energy, describes with singular breadth and fidelity, and generalizes with unrivalled felicity of expression; all these high qualifications have secured, and seem likely to secure, its permanent place in historic literature.
This extent and harmony of design is unquestionably that which distinguishes the work of Gibbon from all other great historical compositions. He has first bridged the abyss between ancient and modern times, and connected together the two great worlds of history. The great advantage which the classical historians possess over those of modern times is in unity of plan, of course greatly facilitated by the narrower sphere to which their researches were confined. Except Herodotus, the great historians of Greece—we exclude the more modern compilers, like Diodorus Siculus—limited themselves to a single period, or at 'east to the contracted sphere of Grecian affairs. As far as the Barbarians trespassed within the Grecian boundary, or were necessarily mingled up with Grecian politics, they were admitted into the pale of Grecian history; but to Thucydides and to Xenophon, excepting in the Persian inroad of the latter, Greece was the world. Natural unity confined their narrative almost to chronological order, the episodes were of rare occurrence and extremely brief. To the Roman historians the course was equally clear and defined. Rome was their centre of unity; and the uniformity with which the circle of the Roman dominion spread around, the regularity with which their civil polity expanded, forced, as it were, upon the Roman historian that plan which Polybius announces as the subject of his history, the means and the manner by which the whole world became subject to the Roman sway. How different the complicated politics of the European kingdoms! Every national history, to be complete, must, in a certain sense, be the history of Europe; there is no knowing to how remote a quarter it may be necessary to trace our most domestic events; from a country, how apparently disconnected, may originate the impulse which gives its direction to the whole course of affairs.
  • Edward Gibbon Cover

    (Putney, Londra, 1737 - Londra 1794) storico inglese. Durante un viaggio in Italia (1765) tracciò il piano dell’opera a cui è legata la sua fama, Storia della decadenza e caduta dell’impero romano (History of the decline and fall of the Roman empire, 6 voll., 1776-88). Formatosi alla storiografia illuminista (Voltaire, Montesquieu, Hume), di cui sviluppò la tendenza razionalistica e laica, G. vide nel cristianesimo il principale elemento disgregativo della struttura imperiale romana. Motivi d’interesse nella sua opera sono, oltre alla accurata documentazione, l’uso sapiente dell’ironia e uno stile che ancora oggi si impone come modello di prosa. Approfondisci
Note legali