Anno: 1993
Rilegatura: Paperback / softback
Pagine: 328 p.
Testo in English
Dimensioni: 229 x 152 mm
Peso: 484 gr.
  • EAN: 9780300057836
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Descrizione
In this provocative new book a philosopher-physician explores issues of medical ethics involved in a physician's use of power. Drawing from literary works dealing with medical power-from Dostoevsky's "The Grand Inquisitor" to stories by Richard Selzer-Dr. Howard Brody argues that proposals to reduce or eliminate the power of the physician are misguided; instead, guidelines should be developed for the use of medical power so that the physician shares with the patient both information and the responsibility for deciding on appropriate treatment. "Some years ago, Brody, a physician with both clinical and academic obligations, began wondering why the concept of power so seldom entered into discussions of medical ethics. . . . This solidly written and documented book is Brody's closely reasoned, thought-provoking analysis of that concept. . . . An excellent text for-besides all levels of medical education-law discussion groups and individuals interested in the modern role of medicine."-Booklist "A book with an intellectual energy, literate style, and sturdy originality . . . We could not wish for a wiser guide than this book."-Michael Loudon, Lancet "I find Brody's book fascinating. Surely, the concept of power is of critical importance in medical ethics. It is time that someone provide the serious, systematic examination of it that Brody offers. Brody is one of a very small group of physicians doing serious work in medical ethics. It is delightful to receive his newest contribution. His extensive use of literary material makes the chapters both novel and enjoyable reading."-Robert M. Veatch