The Human Rights Paradox: Universality and Its Discontents

Anno: 2014
Rilegatura: Paperback / softback
Pagine: 260 p.
Testo in English
Dimensioni: 229 x 152 mm
  • EAN: 9780299299743
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Descrizione
Human rights are paradoxical. Advocates across the world invoke the idea that such rights belong to all people, no matter who or where they are. But since humans can only realize their rights in particular places, human rights are both always and never universal. The Human Rights Paradox is the first book to fully embrace this contradiction and reframe human rights as history, contemporary social advocacy, and future prospect. In case studies that span Africa, Latin America, South and Southeast Asia, and the United States, contributors carefully illuminate how social actors create the imperative of human rights through relationships whose entanglements of the global and the local are so profound that one cannot exist apart from the other. These chapters provocatively analyze emerging twenty-first-century horizons of human rights-on one hand, the simultaneous promise and peril of global rights activism through social media, and on the other, the force of intergenerational rights linked to environmental concerns that are both local and global. Taken together, they demonstrate how local struggles and realities transform classic human rights concepts, including "victim," "truth," and "justice." Edited by Steve J. Stern and Scott Straus, The Human Rights Paradox enables us to consider the consequences-for history, social analysis, politics, and advocacy-of understanding that human rights belong both to "humanity" as abstraction as well as to specific people rooted in particular locales.