Outlawed Pigs: Law, Religion, and Culture in Israel

Daphne Barak-Erez

Anno: 2007
Rilegatura: Hardback
Pagine: 160 p.
Testo in English
  • EAN: 9780299221607
pagabile con 18App pagabile con Carta del Docente

Articolo acquistabile con 18App e Carta del Docente

€ 37,13

€ 41,72

Risparmi € 4,59 (11%)

Venduto e spedito da IBS

37 punti Premium

Disponibile in 10 gg

Quantità:
Descrizione
The prohibition against pigs is one of the most powerful symbols of Jewish culture and collective memory. ""Outlawed Pigs"" explores how the historical sensitivity of Jews to the pig prohibition was incorporated into Israeli law and culture. Daphne Barak-Erez specifically traces the course of two laws, one that authorized municipalities to ban the possession and trading in pork within their jurisdiction and another law that forbids pig breeding throughout Israel, except for areas populated mainly by Christians. Her analysis offers a comprehensive, decade-by-decade discussion of the overall relationship between law and culture since the inception of the Israeli nation-state. By examining ever-fluctuating Israeli popular opinion on Israel's two laws outlawing the trade and possession of pigs, Barak-Erez finds an interesting and accessible way to explore the complex interplay of law, religion, and culture in modern Israel, and more specifically a microcosm for the larger question of which lies more at the foundation of Israeli state law: religion or cultural tradition.