The Democratic Wish: Popular Participation and the Limits of American Government, Revised Edition

James A. Morone

Anno: 1998
Rilegatura: Paperback / softback
Pagine: 416 p.
Testo in English
Dimensioni: 210 x 140 mm
Peso: 499 gr.
  • EAN: 9780300074659
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Descrizione
This prize-winning book reinterprets more than 200 years of American political history as the interplay between the public's dread of government power and its yearning for communal democracy. James Morone argues that Americans will never solve their collective problems as long as they instinctively fear all public power as a threat to liberty. This revised edition includes a new final chapter about contemporary populism, government bashing, and democratic wishes. Winner of the 1991 Gladys M. Kammerer Award "The Democratic Wish merits the highest compliments one can accord a public policy book. It spotlights a problem that can no longer be evaded. And it makes you think."-Alan Tonelson, New York Times Book Review "Morone writes with flair and passion. The fact that he puts forth a provocative argument and provides concise histories of labor, civil rights, and health care politics makes this book especially useful for teaching American politics."-R. Shep Melnick, Journal of Interdisciplinary History "Morone's contribution to our understanding of state building . . . is substantial and profound."-John S. Dryzek, American Political Science Review "This stimulating reinterpretation of American political history will interest both scholars concerned about the past and citizens concerned about the future."-Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. "This is a persuasive, illuminating study in American political ideas and the disappointments of reform."-Dean McSweeney, American Politics Review