copertina

Woe Is I

Patricia T. O'Conner

0 recensioni
Con la tua recensione raccogli punti Premium
Editore: Riverhead Books
Formato: EPUB con DRM
Testo in en
Compatibilità: Tutti i dispositivi (eccetto Kindle) Scopri di più
Dimensioni: 1,38 MB
  • EAN: 9780525533061
pagabile con 18App pagabile con Carta del Docente
Articolo acquistabile con 18App e Carta del Docente

€ 10,70

Punti Premium: 11

Venduto e spedito da IBS

EBOOK INGLESE
Aggiungi al carrello
spinner
Fai un regalo
spinner

non è possibile acquistare ebook su dispositivi Apple. Puoi comunque aggiungerli alla wishlist

Gaia la libraia

Gaia la libraia Vuoi ricevere un'email sui tuoi prodotti preferiti? Chiedi a Gaia, la tua assistente personale

A revised and updated edition of the iconic grammar guide for the 21st century.

In this expanded and updated edition of Woe Is I, former editor at The New York Times Book Review Patricia T. O'Conner unties the knottiest grammar tangles with the same insight and humor that have charmed and enlightened readers of previous editions for years. With fresh insights into the rights, wrongs, and maybes of English grammar and usage, O'Conner offers in Woe Is I down-to-earth explanations and plain-English solutions to the language mysteries that bedevil all of us.

"Books about English grammar and usage are... never content with the status quo," O'Conner writes. "That's because English is not a stay-put language. It's always changing--expanding here, shrinking there, trying on new things, casting off old ones... Time doesn't stand still and neither does language."

In this fourth edition, O'Conner explains how the usage of an array of words has evolved. For example, the once-shunned "they," "them," and "their" for an unknown somebody is now acceptable. And the battle between "who" and "whom" has just about been won, O'Conner says (hint: It wasn't by "whom"). Then there's the use of "taller than me" in simple comparisons, instead of the ramrod-stiff "taller than I." "May" and "might," "use to" and "used to," abbreviations that use periods and those that don't, and the evolving definition of "unique" are all explained here by O'Conner. The result is an engaging, up-to-date and jargon-free guide to every reader's questions about grammar, style, and usage for the 21st century.

Note legali